Some Education Employees Dislike The Pension Reform Plans

By: Marie Luby Email
By: Marie Luby Email

Many of Kentucky's education employees are not happy with the tentative pension reform plans.

They say compromise is necessary to fix their retirement systems and avoid even bigger problems in the future.

The latest pension reform plan for employees in Kentucky's education system isn't a hit with KEA, but officials say it's the least damaging proposal they've seen so far.

“We're of the opinion that public school employees have always paid their contribution, and that this legislation is punitive toward the public school employees; they're the ones feeling the pain from this legislation,” Tom Denton, Vice President of KEA, said.

KEA officials say for seven of the last 13 years, the state hasn't paid its required amount into the retirement systems.

Now legislators are promising full funding by 2024 in exchange for employees giving up a chunk of their cost of living adjustment when they retire.

“Imagine if we did that to Shell Oil. Say, you can only raise the price of gas 1.5%. It's not very practical,” Wayne Bishop, President Perry County Education Association said.

Many educators say they're unsure about the long-term impact on recruiting new hires.

“We want to see new educators come in. But at the same time we want to make sure that they are secure, and we want to make sure that they have a retirement to look forward to just like we did,” Juanita Spangler said.

KEA officials say they hope the sacrifices they're willing to make now, will help put a shaky pension system on stable ground.

KEA officials also tell us they hope all sides stick to their tentative agreement, so the special session ends as quickly as possible.


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Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
  • by RALPH Location: PIKEVILLE on Jun 24, 2008 at 10:14 AM
    TIME FOR THE TEACHERS ACTIVE AND RETIRED TO BAN TOGATHER AND SUE THE STATE FOR FAILING TO HOLD UP THEIR END OF THE CONTRACT. A SIGNED CONTRACT IS BIDDING. OR WAS THE LAST TIME I HAD ANY DEALINGS WITH A WRITTEN CONTRACT.
  • by Cat on Jun 24, 2008 at 05:53 AM
    When I decided to going into the teaching profession, my children were in school. I started college because my husband worked in the union mines and everytime we turned around they were striking. Finally the mines that he worked at closed. We thought that if I when to college to become a teacher that we were working toward our future. I had no idea that when I was ready to retire that I COULD NOT draw his social security. This is so unfair. If he dies, the social security that he has worked for more than 40 years goes to someone else. Had I known this, I would have never gone into education. This is a warning to the young people getting ready to go to college. The state of Kentucky is always ready to dump on the teachers/or anyone in education. Think twice before going in to the education field. I know that if I had known this my career would have been in the medical field. THANK YOU KENTUCKY FOR MESSING UP EDUCATION AGAIN. Dem.and Rep. are alike.
  • by James Location: SE KY on Jun 23, 2008 at 03:09 PM
    Isn't the pension negoatied between the KEA and the state? If so, then the state is guilty of breach of contract by failing to fund the plan in a timely manner. I have a notion that the teachers are being asked to pay out of pocket into a system that will never be fully funded, by giving up part of their cola. Wake up teachers and put your feet down to such nonsense as is being proposed by our illusterous governor.

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