WKYT | Lexington, Kentucky | News

In final stretch, rivals stress differences and bipartisanship hopes

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney raced across competitive battleground states Sunday.

They stressed differences on the economy, health care and more while professing a willingness to work across party lines to end gridlock in Washington.

Obama told thousands of cheering supporters in New Hampshire they "have the power." The president said he wants to work across party lines, but said he won't give up priorities such as college financial aid or the health care law he pushed through Congress.

Boos from Romney's partisans in Cleveland turned to appreciative laughter when the Republican nominee began a sentence by saying, "If the president were to be elected," and ended it with, "It's possible but not likely."

After a campaign than began more than a year ago, late public opinion polls were unpredictably tight for the nationwide popular vote. But they suggested an advantage for the president in the state-by-state competition for electoral votes.

Polls suggest the race is very close. Both campaigns predict wins.

Romney campaigned in four battleground states on Sunday, including Pennsylvania. Romney's visit follows the decision by his campaign and its Republican allies to put millions of dollars in television advertising in Pennsylvania during the race's final weeks to try to make it competitive.

No Republican presidential candidate has carried the state since 1988.

Tuesday's election results may be uncertain, but President Obama and the tight circle of advisers who have surrounded him for years know one thing for sure.

Win or lose, this is it for campaigning.

These final days of Obama's final political campaign, played out across many of the same towns and cities that propelled him to the White House in 2008, are full of nostalgia.

Former staffers and old friends are traveling with the president for the campaign's final stretch. Obama's closing argument speech is peppered with talk of change, the central theme of his 2008 bid. And the campaign's fundraising juggernaut, which is shutting down for good, already sent its last email to supporters, bidding them "goodbye."


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