WKYT | Lexington, Kentucky | News

New Yorkers back to work under sunny skies following superstorm

NEW YORK (AP) - For the first time since Hurricane Sandy struck, there's bright sunshine today over New York City, after days of gray skies, rain and wind.

The stock exchange is up and running -- on generator power -- after being shut down for two days. And limited subway service is supposed to start tomorrow.

Morning rush-hour traffic was heavy today in New York as people started returning to work. Some commuters were seen waiting at bus stops -- for buses running free of charge. Two main tunnels connecting Manhattan with Brooklyn and New Jersey remain closed, but bridges into the city are open.

About 6.5 million homes and businesses are still without power from the storm, which left at least 61 people dead and inflicted billions of dollars in damage. Four million of those outages are in New York and New Jersey.

Outages in New Jersey's two largest cities, Newark and Jersey City, left traffic signals dark, resulting in fender-benders at intersections where police weren't directing traffic. At one supermarket in Jersey City, there were long lines to get bread and use an electrical outlet to charge cellphones.

Gov: Limited NY transit service resuming

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says limited subway service will resume in New York City on Thursday.

Cuomo also says limited commuter rail service on the Long Island Rail Road and the Metro-North railroad will resume at 2 p.m. Wednesday.

He says subway service will be supplemented with buses between Manhattan and Brooklyn. He says more details will be released later.

The floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels because of Hurricane Sandy and the hybrid storm it spawned pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery.

Many tunnels that carry trains were flooded by the storm, which represents the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history.

Northeast air travel resumes as JFK, Newark reopen

Air travelers stranded in the Northeast are a little closer to getting home.

Two of New York City's three major airports are open. Flights are slowly resuming at John F. Kennedy International and Newark Liberty International. LaGuardia is still closed.

Airlines say they are beginning limited service in New York after Hurricane Sandy shut down air travel in the Northeast earlier this week.

Travelers hoping to fly out of New York on Wednesday are being told to check with their airline before heading to the airport.

Delta Air Lines Inc. says it hopes to resume flying at LaGuardia on Thursday. However, airport authorities say they don't know yet when LaGuardia will reopen. Airports in Washington and Philadelphia re-opened on Tuesday.

Amtrak restores service to Newark airport

Amtrak says it has restored train service to Newark Liberty International Airport.

But the railroad said Wednesday that service to and from New York's Penn Station was still not operating because train tunnels under the Hudson and East rivers are flooded. Northeast Regional service between Newark, N.J., and Boston and Acela Express service for the length of the Northeast Corridor remain suspended with no date set for resumption.

Amtrak is providing modified Northeast Regional service between Newark and points south, including restored service in Virginia. Keystone service in Pennsylvania and modified Downeaster between Boston and Portland, Maine service are also operating.

Empire service between New York City and other cities in the state, and Canada was still out of commission.

Tempers flare in NJ city where thousands stranded

Tempers are flaring in Hoboken, N.J., as residents complain officials in the flooded city on the Hudson River have been slow to get out food and water to the stranded.

At the National Guard staging area in front of City Hall, a man screamed at emergency officials. He says he blew up an air mattress to float over to City Hall to see why no supplies were getting out. He says he lives just blocks away and was expecting the city to at least get out food and water.

National Guard troops are now delivering meals and other supplies and evacuating residents.

An 80-year-old resident of a senior high-rise in downtown Hoboken tells The Associated Press he walked down 15 flights to get out of his building, which is surrounded by floodwaters. Frank Bongiorno says he went without food.


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus

WKYT

2851 Winchester Rd. Lexington, Ky 40509 859-299-0411 - switchboard 859-299-2727 - newsroom
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 176633501 - wkyt.com/a?a=176633501
Gray Television, Inc.