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Ohio zoo tries to mate rhino siblings

 With the survival of a species on the line, Cincinnati Zoo scientists are hoping to mate their lone female Sumatran  rhino with her little brother.

In this Wednesday, July 17, 2013 photo, Suci, a female Sumatran rhino, sniffs the air at the Cincinnati Zoo in Cincinnati. Her brother, Harapan, is in a separate area next to hers. With the global population of Sumatran rhinos plunging at an alarming rate, Cincinnati Zoo experts who have some success with captive breeding are trying something they admit is a desperation effort _ bringing back the brother of a female rhino in hopes they will mate. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

CINCINNATI (AP) - With the survival of a species on the line, Cincinnati Zoo scientists are hoping to mate their lone female Sumatran rhino with her little brother.

The desperation effort follows a meeting in Singapore among conservationists that concluded there might be as few as 100 of the two-horned, hairy rhinos remaining in their native southeast Asia. Species numbers have dropped sharply as development takes away habitat and poachers hunt them for their prized horns.

The Cincinnati Zoo has been a pioneer in captive breeding of the rhino species. It recently brought the male back to his birthplace from the Los Angeles Zoo and soon will try to have him mate with its lone female. Scientist Terri Roth says inbreeding carries risks, but it's necessary to start producing more rhino babies.

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Long before its current effort to breed critically endangered Sumatran rhinos, the Cincinnati Zoo was the final home of the last-known passenger pigeon.

Once flocking by the millions, the pigeons started disappearing rapidly in the late 19th century because of commercial food hunting and loss of forest habitats. The Cincinnati Zoo says it offered $1,000 for a breeding pair without success and then tried to mate its sole female with other species of pigeons in a fruitless bid to keep her line alive.

The pigeon named Martha died on Sept. 1, 1914, at the reported age of 29.

She and her species are memorialized with a statue and in a building at the Cincinnati Zoo.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


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