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Controlled burn at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

By: Angela Sparkman Email
By: Angela Sparkman Email
More than 200 acres burned Tuesday afternoon near Middlesboro, but there is no reason for the community to worry.

The Associated Press
Firefighter Jimmy Niesen of Surprise, Ariz., sprays water on a hot spot during the Wallow Fire in Greer, Ariz., on Saturday. Smoke from the huge wildfire in eastern Arizona that has claimed more than 30 homes and forced nearly 10,000 people to flee has officials worried about serious health effects to residents and firefighters as tiny particles of soot in the air reached “astronomical” levels.

More than 200 acres burned Tuesday afternoon near Middlesboro, but there is no reason for the community to worry.

Firefighters in the Cumberland Gap National Historical Park set fire to the woods on purpose!

Smoke filled the air around Middlesboro.

Fires burned in the mountains in the Cumberland Gap National Historical Park.

Crews set these fires for a controlled burn.

“There's a lot of history burning in this area for centuries,” Shane Sturgill said.

Park leaders say these fires will reduce the risk for wildfires later on in the season.

The fires burn leaves and other debris.

“We're reducing the hazardous fuels out here in case we have a catastrophic wildfire and it does more damage to the hardwoods than what we're doing here,” Sturgill said.

It will also improve the forest.

“To promote regeneration of fire dependent species as well as removal of hazardous fuels,” Sturgill said.

234 acres burned and more than 30 firefighters from several states lit the fires and monitored the flames.

Crews say the fires pose no threat to the neighboring communities.

This was the second controlled burn this year in the park.


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