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TSA agents making dangerous discoveries at airport

By: Brittany Pelletz Email
By: Brittany Pelletz Email

Hundreds of passengers land in Lexington every day, but not before going through TSA.

“I think ten years after 911; the TSA is evolving as an agency. First and foremost, I want to give credit to the officers who are here every day, working with the traveling public through the security check points, finding items that could be dangerous on an aircraft,” says Jim Fotenos, TSA spokesman.

At the Blue Grass Airport, there are a variety of dangerous items that people attempt to travel with every day.

“If there is a prohibited item, our officers do have to pull that bag and it does slow the process down for everyone,” adds Fotenos.

Ten to twenty knives a day are confiscated after a TSA agent discovers the weapons inside of the X-Ray machine.

Martial arts weapons, tasers, and tools are also part of the collection at the Blue Grass airport. There are also forbidden items that can sometime be deceiving to the eye.

“This looks like a real firearm. It's a replica Beretta but it's actually a lighter. But for passengers on an aircraft, they would be able to tell this difference between a replica and a real Beretta,” says Fotenos.
Fotenos believes many of these things are brought here unintentionally, “Here at Blue Grass Airport, when a prohibited item comes to Blue Grass Airport, it's because an individual forgot it was in their bag or didn't know it was prohibited.”

Pending the items are not illegal, passengers are given the option to go back and put their restricted item in their checked baggage, just like this woman, Ashli Pyles, who tried to take this lotion and body spray on board.

“I actually think it was nice of them because I've actually had them thrown away before. So the fact that they let me just come back and put them in my checked baggage was really nice,” says Pyles.
But for those that don't have the time or could care less about keeping their things, they can hand it over to the Transportation Security Administration.

“The items that are surrendered here at the security check point are all kept for a period of time and then they are turned over to the state of Kentucky,” says Fotenos.

Once the items are turned over to the state, they are taken to Louisville Airport. Four times a year, the Kentucky Finance and Administration Department picks up the collection and either sells the items on EBay or hosts a spot bid auction in Frankfort.


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