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WKYT team coverage of snow and road conditions

A winter storm moved into Kentucky, bringing with it widespread snow to the region.
A winter storm moved into Kentucky, bringing with it widespread snow to the region.(WKYT)
Published: Jan. 17, 2022 at 10:26 AM EST
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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - A winter storm moved into Kentucky, bringing with it widespread snow to the region.

The WKYT team spread out around the region to bring you the latest on the snow and road conditions.

Lexington

There’s definitely a lot more traffic on the roads at 5:00 p.m. Monday than we saw around 11:00 p.m. Sunday night, and the roads themselves are clearly much better. Lexington crews were out all hours of the night working to get the roads as drivable as they are now.

Even though the main roads and a good bit of some roads are clear, a few people we talked to said what we saw during the last snowstorm actually kept them off the roads this time.

One Lexington man, Jeff Jones, said he had friends that got stuck on I-75 last time, and hearing their stories of being caught in traffic for hours was more than enough to keep him home this time, even though he knew we weren’t going to get quite as much snow.

He said he didn’t have to go into work because of the holiday and was able to stock up on gas and supplies on Saturday.

“Today was probably the only day we really went out. We went and got gas the night before. I was like, ‘I am not going to go out and get stuck in this mess,’” Jones said.

While the roads are much clearer today, Fayette County schools still haven’t decided whether they’ll have in person school Tuesday or use an NTI day. We’ll update you once we learn that decision.

Even though the main roads and a good bit of some roads are clear, a few people we talked to said they stayed off the roads this time.

Morehead

As road crews try to clean up in Rowan County, slick roads and concerns over ice remain. Even still, some Morehead State students braved what the winter storm left behind to move in for the spring semester.

“All the crews are still out now, moving snow and mostly focusing on the back roads,” said Allen Blair with the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

Blair said the good news is that the snow is plowing off roads easily today. But concerns still remain.

“Ice is going to be a possibility all day and into the evening and overnight,” Blair said.

He says main roads like I-64 are now in good shape, and that they were able to get ahead once the snow tapered off overnight.

Those driving conditions, while improved on the main roads, are still complicated when it comes to the local roads. Students and parents at Morehead State University said it’s made for a difficult move in, particularly once they drove into town.

Some families told us it was the coldest and wettest move-in experience they’ve had so far. On the bright side, the university canceled classes on Tuesday, and students have more time to get settled in.

Blair said his crews will work diligently until roads are safe.

“Our crews are still going to be out throughout the day making sure we clear the last of the snow and will hopefully get it clear before the overnight hours,” Blair said.

Blair said that with the sun peeking out Tuesday, he’s hopeful anything that is left on the roads overnight will naturally clear out.

Morehead State students braved what the winter storm left behind to move in for the spring semester.

Laurel County

From being without power, to treacherous driving, the snow really had a big impact in southern Kentucky.

A spokesperson for Kentucky Utilities said all their customers should have had their power restored by now. One of their larger outages was just off exit 29 in Corbin, impacting some hotels, restaurants and a truck stop—200 customers total. Jackson Energy had 2,300 still in the dark as of 4:00 p.m.

Jackson Energy had 11 crews dedicated to Laurel County alone, but they were having trouble getting to some of the areas. People without were making the most of it.

“We are without power. Running on a generator. Gas logs for heat. Comfortable at home. We are ok. Sometimes it is good to turn technology off,” London resident Trent Pool said.

Police said they had fewer problems on the roads this storm than the last as most folks stayed home.

Jackson Energy had 11 crews dedicated to Laurel County alone, but they were having trouble getting to some of the areas.

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