Lexington block party seeks to build bond between community members and city

The Lexington PAL and other community leaders joined forces to put on a block party on Charles Avenue, which came after a violent stretch in Lexington.
Published: Sep. 17, 2022 at 10:26 PM EDT
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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - The Lexington PAL and other community leaders joined forces to put on a block party on Charles Avenue, which came after a violent stretch in Lexington.

The city’s West End is an area which has had its struggles with violence - much like the entire city is having now.

But Stephen Overstreet has lived here his whole life and says that violence doesn’t represent the people who make up this neighborhood.

“I’m West End through and through...from grade school all to the top,” said Overstreet, who serves as president of the Georgetown Street Area Neighborhood Association. “We want to be in a happy place, we don’t want to have the violence - that’s not what we love about our hood.”

So they’re trying to create that happy place with some fun and games.

“What we’re doing here today says this is our neighborhood, this is our community and we are not afraid of coming out and joining hands,” said Josh McCurn, a councilmember representing Lexington’s second district.

They also put on a community conversation for people to learn more about the city’s ongoing issues with gun violence, as well as what they’re doing to try and control it.

Overstreet says these events could be part of the solution by bringing this community closer to its city leaders - one block at a time.

“We have got to make sure that there’s a connection between the city officials law enforcement, the people who prosecute people, and the community itself. that is the number one component we’re gonna be able to use to fight any of this that’s going on in the city,” Overstreet said.

McCurn and Overstreet say the next block party will take place on October 8th on Glen Arvin Avenue. They hope it will continue to help building the bond between the city and its citizens.

“Our neighborhood can be this every day,” said Overstreet. “All day, all the time”