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Crossroads Church partners with non-profit to pay off more than $45 million of people's medical debt

Crossroads Church locations in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, and Indiana raised money to pay off...
Crossroads Church locations in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, and Indiana raised money to pay off more than $45 million for thousands of people with medical debt.(WKYT)
Published: Feb. 24, 2020 at 9:48 PM EST
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The message in a sermon last November ended up reaching further than the last row of pews.

"We should be carrying one another’s burdens,” Crossroads Lexington Pastor Bryan Carter said. “The Bible is very clear about saying that we should care for one another.”

It was that lesson that Crossroads Church locations in Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, and Indiana kept in mind while raising money to take care of other people's burden of medical debt.

"It’s very likely that someone in your family or someone that you know is going to end up with medical debt at some point in their life," Carter said.

For one woman who wanted to remain anonymous, that point was right now. But, she was so skeptical of the letter that said her medical debt had been paid by total strangers, she actually threw it away.

"Oh my gosh, this is real,” the letter recipient said. “It's the yellow envelope, it's not a hoax."

More like a saving grace for about 45,000 households who are now free of the more than $45 million total in debt. Almost $2 million of that total was paid off for people in Central Kentucky.

Carter said the money was raised in just about 24 hours, and at Crossroads Lexington, they only asked for donations from members already giving about 10 percent of their income to the church. It shows a huge impact made by only a small part of the congregation

The churches partnered with RIP Medical Debt, a non-profit organization that helps eliminate medical bills for pennies on the dollar.

"It was to impact people in our community and to give them a chance at hope because the medical debt had buried them," Carter said.

And for one woman who received the letter, it turned into the chance to spread the sermon's original message.

"I don't even go to church there,” she said. “So, I’m definitely paying it forward."

Pastor Carter said the letters were sent out about three weeks ago. Find more details about the effort

.