Kentucky bill would void federal laws restricting gun ownership

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FRANKFORT, Ky. (WKYT) - President Obama's gun control plan has sparked a fierce debate around the country. He wants to expand background checks for gun sales, but some Kentucky lawmakers think his plan goes too far. So now they'll consider a bill that would declare all federal laws restricting gun ownership void in Kentucky.

It's been a 'hot' topic for the feds and the nationwide discussion surrounding gun control has landed the same topic in the Statehouse.

"Kentucky, the Commonwealth, will not abridge any of our Second Amendment rights," State Rep. Diane St. Onge said.

In fact the same day President Obama addressed the nation the Kentucky Statehouse talked about the nation's Second Amendment right to bear arms.

House Bill 35 has been introduced. It cites The Constitution of the United States, the Second Amendment; and it's purpose according to Rep. St. Onge isn't to change current Kentucky law.

"The federal government knows what they can and cannot do, but should they step beyond that line and do anything which does abridge those rights, then we as a Commonwealth will not recognize that here."

According to St. Onge this bill has bipartisan support, but we did talk with the House Speaker and he doesn't seem excited about it, citing rights of the federal government.

"No matter what the political moment is, I have never voted for anything that in my mind was unconstitutional because I put my hand on a bible and I swore to my god to uphold the Constitution of the United States and I'm not going to, for political expediency, violate that oath," Speaker of the House Greg Stumbo said.

Although the Speaker may not agree, St. Onge says it's a safety guard.

"We need to make a stance, we need to let folks know where we do stand and the rest of the country should be doing so as well," St. Onge said.

The House Bill has not been signed to a committee yet.



 
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