Jennifer Palumbo goes one-on-one with UK recruiting coordinator Vince Marrow

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) - When bringing Vince Marrow to Kentucky, head coach Mark Stoops spoke said, “His diverse experiences as a coach and NFL player will be invaluable to our players and our program. He also is a great recruiter, especially with his outstanding connections in Ohio.”

Kentucky’s three recruiting classes under the current staff are UK’s three highest-rated groups in the history of the Rivals.com evaluation. Marrow has played a key role in those efforts, spearheaded with numerous signees who hail from the Buckeye State.

Stoops and Marrow, both from Youngstown, Ohio, knew each other as children before playing football together at Cardinal Mooney High School. Marrow went on to have a successful playing career collegiately and professionally as a tight end before entering the coaching ranks.

Marrow (pronounced the same as in the term “bone marrow”) came to UK from Nebraska, where he coached the Cornhuskers’ tight ends for two years. In 2012, Marrow helped guide NU’s tight ends to a combined 48 catches for 651 yards and five touchdowns, while their blocking ability helped NU rank eighth in the country in rushing offense.

Two of Marrow’s tight ends, Ben Cotton and Kyler Reed, who ranked fourth and sixth on the team respectively in receiving, earned honorable-mention All-Big Ten honors. The Huskers went 10-4 and played in the Capital One Bowl.

Marrow’s knowledge and coaching had an impact on the Nebraska offense as the Cornhuskers ranked 26th in total offense and 28th in scoring offense nationally, an improvement from 44th in total offense and 39th in scoring offense the year before he arrived.

Marrow showed an impact on the Huskers’ offense in his first season, helping Nebraska average nearly 30 points per game in 2011, scoring at least two touchdowns in every game throughout the season, a feat that an NU team had accomplished only twice in the past 10 seasons. The Cornhuskers went 9-4, including a trip to the Capital One Bowl.

Although Marrow’s title was graduate assistant in his term at Nebraska, he had an expanded role in the spring of 2012, getting to hit the recruiting trail after Nebraska was granted a waiver from the NCAA to allow Marrow to recruit off campus while associate head coach Barney Cotton was unable to recruit because of surgery. Marrow made an immediate impact on NU’s recruiting in Ohio.

Prior to his stint at Nebraska, Marrow spent six years in the coaching ranks, mostly in professional football with NFL Europe and the United Football League. The year before joining the staff at NU, Marrow was tight ends coach with the Omaha Nighthawks of the UFL.

Before serving as the head coach of Holland High School in Springfield, Ohio in 2009, Marrow earned his first collegiate coaching position at his alma mater, Toledo, in 2008. Marrow coached the Rockets’ tight ends, helping John Allen and Tom Burzine to finish third and fifth on the team in receiving, respectively.

Marrow began his coaching career in NFL Europe, coaching tackles and tight ends with the Rhein Fire (Düsseldorf, Germany) from 2006-07 before holding the same position with the Berlin Thunder from 2005-06.

Marrow had a professional playing career as a member of NFL rosters on five teams, including Buffalo, Carolina, New York Jets, Chicago and San Francisco. After his NFL days ended, Marrow played for the Frankfurt Galaxy of NFL Europe in 1998, earning all-league honors with 32 receptions for 345 yards. He also played for the Orlando Rage in the XFL in 2001.

Marrow began his collegiate playing career at Youngstown State before transferring to Toledo. Marrow played two seasons at Toledo, earning second-team All-Mid-American Conference honors in 1991 before being drafted by the Bills in 1992.

Marrow graduated from Toledo with a degree in criminal justice. He and his wife, Dr. Monique Marrow, have five children, Mike, Phylica, Merrisa, Victoria and Aryanna.



 
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