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Money Matters

Three things to do for your investments during a pandemic


The Secure Act: What is it and who stands to benefit from it?


What the long-term fallout from Coronavirus might look like


How companies are coping with job loss due to COVID-19


What the emergency interest rate cut means for you


Tax Tips: How to make the filing process easier


Succession planning: How to start the conversation


How to use company stock in your retirement plan


The pros and cons of couples keeping finances separate


How the presidential election could impact the stock market


How to become financially independent when you're cut off by family


How to become financially independent when you've been cut off by your family


Why January is key to predicting the market in 2020


How to know which financial advisor is right for you


Tips for staying financially healthy through the holidays


How to protect your privacy when using smart TVs


Understanding Medicare Advantage Plans


How to balance risks and rewards when investing


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MoneyWatch

With restaurants and bars across the country closed or limited to takeout service, the industry has lost an estimated $25 billion in sales in the first three weeks of March. Adriana Diaz reports.
There are signs that an already crippled economy may get even worse. Investment bank Goldman Sachs estimates that unemployment in the U.S. will explode to 15% by the end of June, and that the U.S. gross domestic product will drop as much as 34%. Mark Strassmann has a closer look.
New York City mayor and New York state Attorney General say they'll investigate if the firing was retaliatory.
"This is the fastest move in history from an all-time high to a bear market," one finance pro commented.
Companies with 500 or fewer workers that have been hurt by the pandemic are eligible for loans to cover payroll and bills.
As essential workers strike across the country, Walmart is implementing stricter guidelines to keep its employees safe.
The video-conferencing tool has seen its user accounts soar recently, putting a spotlight on its security measures.
Marriott said 5.2 million hotel guests may have had their personal information accessed dating back to mid-January.
With millions more people out of work, many states are freezing evictions. But that doesn't mean free rent.
Iger isn't the only Disney employee giving up some earnings while the Disney parks remain closed.